Legal Cynicism and Race: Do Black Lives Really Matter?

Legal cynicism is a sociocultural or sociopolitical lens through which members of a community observe, perceive, and interpret their engagement with the legal system or, in this case, enforcement agents of the law. Regrettably, it appears that, too frequently, instead of stabilizing the issue, law enforcement adversely escalates the matter. Legal cynicism erodes the legitimacy […]

Frank Franklin II, PhD, JD

A Tale of Two Narratives: Gender Identity, Mental Health, and the Black Male

Regardless of health behaviors, the inequitable burden of mental health disorders and undiagnosed need borne by the black male is also a consequence of racial discrimination and race-related stressors. The narrative of the African American male can be characterized as a perpetual¬†inquiry of identity permissibility. The narrative exemplifies a lived experience of boundaries and freedoms […]

Tuskegee and HeLa: Flint, Michigan Too?

The water crisis in Flint, Mich. demonstrates yet another flagrant disregard for the health and well-being of America’s urban underclass. A disregard premised on discriminatory indifferences for the black, brown, and the poor. In spite of state officials purporting that Flint’s drinking water was fine, for a year and half, the residents of Flint were […]

Gentrification: Economic Integration or The New Plantation?

The historical definition of gentrification can be attributed to the Urban Geographer, Ruth Glass, who defined gentrification as the process of middle- and upper-class households moving into distressed (i.e., economic) working-class neighborhoods, improving the housing stock, and eventually displacing the working-class residents and, consequently, transforming the social fabric of the neighborhood. More expansive definitions attempt […]

The Cost of Poverty: A Price We All Must Pay

Current research regarding the impact of economic distress continues to establish the relationship between chronic poverty and well-being, and elucidates the biological, physiological, and sociological, mechanisms behind the toxic association. The child pays the greatest price of the poor. Economic distress produces lifelong effects of childhood adversity and toxic stress. Given that racial and ethnic […]

Community-Based Strategies To Reduce Recidivism Among Non-Violent Offenders

Several states such as New York, California, and New Jersey have made efforts to reduce their prison populations. A strategic component of the reduction is the use of community-based services (CBS) to transition adult and juvenile non-violent offenders. Community-based services have been shown to be an important element in reducing recidivism and enhancing reentry. Community-based […]

Being McKinney: Legal Cynicism and Race

The McKinney, Texas, swimming pool incident exemplifies one of the many sources of legal cynicism among minority and poor communities in America. Legal cynicism is a sociocultural or sociopolitical lens through which members of a community observe, perceive, and interpret their engagement with the legal system or, in this case, enforcement agents of the law. […]